Cinnamon for Reactive Hypoglycemia

CinnamonFor most of my life I did not realize this, but I have come to find out through research and observation that my body has a hard time processing sugar.  It seems that my body has a negative reaction to foods with a high glycemic load.

Eating candy, white bread, most pasta ,and even many types of fruit, seem to cause the body to have an insulin rush and subsequent Low Blood Sugar Type symptoms…commonly known as Reactive Hypoglycemia.

Almost immediately after eating sugary food or snacks, I can feel my adrenaline rise and my heart pound.  I get nervous, tense, irritable, and anxious.  My body seems to go into fight or flight mode.

My brain starts to get a little fuzzy, and my mind starts to shut down. I can suddenly get very sleepy and have an urgent need to lie down.  This is especially dangerous when driving my car.

Recently I began experimenting with taking cinnamon in hopes of alleviating the Reactive Hypoglycemia symptoms.

I am here to report that it is working!

No adrenaline rush, no mind fuzz, no anxiousness, and no need to lie down after consuming sugary foods and snacks.

I am not sure of the technical reasons why it works for this body, but it is clear that cinnamon definitely helps the cells absorb and utilize sugar in a beneficial way.

I don’t plan on becoming a junk food junkie or anything, but at least I now have  a solution if I know I will be eating in a way that would previously have knocked me for a loop.

Just wanted to share in case anyone has similar issue…

Waking Up In Free Fall

freefallI am finding that the business of releasing the “me” can be somewhat scary at times.

When silence arrives I often find myself inspired to act on an intuition or urge that ordinarily I would not follow…or even notice.

But sometimes after I take that leap into the abyss, the “me” rushes back in and it is as if I suddenly find myself in free fall.

This is terrifying for the “me” to wake up and find itself in places it avoided previously.

My job when this happens is to once again ignore the “me” and trust that the process is happening exactly how it is supposed to.

Even if things turn out in a fashion the “me” does not find preferable, I still must have faith that the universe is taking care of all the details and that everything is OK just as it is.

Silence is Love

Jack Kerouac

What is Reality Anyway?

Dealing with Fear Thoughts and the Critical Voice

This is a great video I just found where Benjamin Smythe talks about one way to approach the inner voice of “me” that thinks it’s in charge of everything.



0:33What would happen if you loved that voice?”

1:24  “And you even do this radical thing where you open your heart to it.”

2:29 “To hear the fear, and to hear the anger, and to hear the judgement, and to hear the criticism.  And to hear it coming all from the very same source, this really scared separate me…”

3:32 “It’s mad because we sacrifice for love and approval which never actually comes from others.”

4:33 “So have the courage it takes to love something that is just totally terrified.”

5:33 “This voice is developed by culture, it’s developed by lying to yourself.”

6:10 “And if you can love that rage and that anger, it will subside and that voice will become a comedian.”

6:40 “And at first it might be hard to laugh, but over time it’s like you have a best friend with you and all they do is make you laugh…Pretending to be in charge.”

7:55 (The voice) “is totally terrified because it believes it is separate from everything.”

8:50 “You can absolutely do it, it just requires opening your heart to the last person you could imagine opening your heart to.”


Me – Not our natural inclination, but oh so powerful!

Me – And we can apply this to all voices internal and external that try to get the reactionary self activated 🙂

Obtain Silence Through Curiosity

How does it happen?

Place-of-silenceTrying to obtain silence or awareness can be a tricky endeavor.

Anytime there is a “me” there trying to be aware or trying to be silent, awareness and silence will be veiled. Anytime there is any kind of agenda for the “me,”  the “me” is more than happy to jump into the conversation and offer it’s skilled advice or alternate solutions.

The key is to have the “me”  quiet down just enough so the actuality of silence is realized.

There are a zillion and one techniques teachers suggest to help us quiet the mind, and thus recognize the awareness that we are.

One tip you hear many teachers recommend is to “get curious” about what is happening when negative feelings or emotions arise.  They say by being curious, there is a subtle something happening that allows the feelings and sensations to just be as they are.  And when we are just being, the “me” is silent.

But when I tell myself to be curious, it somehow activates the mind too much.  Like I’m telling or commanding myself to ‘do’ something which then triggers “me” to respond or resist to the suggestion.

What seems to be helpful to me is when a feeling or a sensation appears, instead of telling myself to be curious,  I simply ask “how does this _________happen?

“How does this tiredness happen?”

“How does this sadness happen?”

“How does this anger happen?”

“How does this tingly feeling in my stomach happen?”

When I ask this way, I do not get verbal responses. When I ask this way I get silent feedback.  Then I am able to be more aware of what is happening instead of losing myself in mental dialogue.

This method also seems more of an ‘in-the-moment’ activity that has no secret agenda for the benefit of the “me.”

And when there is no agenda for the “me”, I do not find myself fifteen minutes later, lost in mental commentary 🙂

Benjamin Smythe – The Cause of Suffering

1:23  “A lot of suffering is mental narration.  We all deal with physical pain the best we can…mental narration is the rest of it.

‘How am I telling the story about whats going on here?’

And in some ways, not to over-simplify it,  but that just comes down to memory.

The one thing I can’t remember is THIS.”

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